theinsidesource:

This week boasts the sale of a solid 1966 Vespa, restored from the ground up. An eBay seller named Scooter.Restorer writes: “I personally build the best vintage Vespa’s on eBay - period!” We believe him since he’s been restoring for 25 years in his home shop, where he rebuilds these for the hobby factor. Free shipping too. Visit the listing here

“Whenever I’m asked why Southern writers particularly have a penchant for writing about freaks, I say it is because we are still able to recognize one. To be able to recognize a freak, you have to have some conception of the whole man, and in the South the general conception of man is still, in the main, theological. That is a large statement, and it is dangerous to make it, for almost anything you say about Southern belief can be denied in the next breath with equal propriety. But approaching the subject from the standpoint of the writer, I think it is safe to say that while the South is hardly Christ-centered, it is most certainly Christ-haunted. The Southerner, who isn’t convinced of it, is very much afraid that he may have been formed in the image and likeness of God. Ghosts can be very fierce and instructive. They cast strange shadows, particularly in our literature. In any case, it is when the freak can be sensed as a figure for our essential displacement that he attains some depth in literature.”
— Flannery O’Connor (via thatdanielgardner)

shakespeareandpunk:

image

Southern Gothic is a subgenre of Gothic fiction unique to American literature that takes place exclusively in the American South (intro post here). Common themes in Southern Gothic literature include:

  • deeply flawed, disturbing or eccentric characters who may or may not dabble in hoodoo
  • decayed or derelict settings
  • grotesque situations

Read More

“Sin and love and fear are just sounds that people who never sinned nor loved nor feared have for what they never had and cannot have until they forget the words.”
— William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying, 1930 (via ragpicker-and-poet)
“Even the mercy of the Lord burns.”
— Flannery O’Connor, The Violent Bear It Away (via iwanderedinadesertplace)

Q

gabbyglamm asked:

I want to write southern gothic fiction, but I don't know much about the genre.

A

thewritingcafe:

If you want to know about the genre, you have to read it. That’s the best way to know any genre. Here are some Southern Gothic books and here are some playlists inspired by Southern Gothic that you can use for inspiration.

Writing the Southern Gothic Novel

Genre: Southern Gothic

The Southern Gothic Tradition

Southern Lit

Southern Gothic Literature

“While the South is hardly Christ-centered, it is most certainly Christ-haunted.”
— Flannery O’Connor, The Habit of Being (via thedappledthings)
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.

mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)

Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.

Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.

The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.